Jubileum

Not everybody gets to turn 110 years, but our wallpaper factory does. Jubileum is a collection of the century – a birthday gift from all of us at Boråstapeter to all of you across the world who have decorated with our classic, eternally stylish wallpapers for decades and will continue to do so for years to come.

This is a collection that features our most popular patterns since 1905 until today. Inspired by the national romanticism from the turn of the 19th century, the colourful optimism of the 1950s and the warm, vivid patterns that were thrown in for free in the 1980s when the French wave swept across Sweden.

We invite you to browse through our greatest wallpapers of all time, gently brought out from our vast archives and updated in new, modern shades and colours that fit in with your life here and now.

Flora

It isn’t really that unexpected for a country like Sweden to produce wallpapers that dreams are made of. After all, it is a place on earth full of people who are constantly longing for the season when everything starts to blossom again. The 1950s witnessed an unrestrained interest in nature’s most beautiful creations among designers throughout the country.

Magnolia

It’s the defined contours of the flower’s petals that tell the story of the magnolia. A detail that proves that this wallpaper is an interpretation of the 19th century Japanese tinted woodcuts. The same art form that inspired artists such as Monet and Manet in the cafés of Montmartre during this time period.

Ackord

Stripes play with our minds and to­ day we no longer perceive them as separate lines, but rather as one pattern. Similar to the way it works in nature where fields or woods come in all kinds of different shapes and yet somehow manage to create a united harmony. This wallpaper from the 21st century is a virtual digital dream with no strict repetition as far as the eye can see.

Lovisa

Lovisa takes you twice back in time. The first time round is in the early 1900s when we dreamt of “home sweet home” and wrapped our rooms in dense flowery patterns featuring heavily romantic signatures. After that, this snug Swedish wallpaper design began its humble flirt with the rococo of the 1700s.

Espri

This is a wallpaper from the 21st century where nature, people and industry seem to collapse together in a dance­like frenzy. It is truly a pattern full of contrasts. The hand­drawn flowers are graphically designed yet manage to wind their way across the wall.

Mizo

Mizo was brought to Scandinavia courtesy of the Mediterranean preference for tiles and mosaic patterns. When wallpapering became an option, the pattern simply followed suit. The Mediterranean aura of this wallpaper comes from the 1960s and its characteristically warm and lively colours are still highly appreciated today.

Funkis

If you put your ear close enough, you might just pick up the hammer blows from the public housing projects that transformed Sweden during the 1950s and ’60s. This classic wallpaper from the Million Programme era is in fact the most sold wallpaper type in the history of Sweden.

Jordgubben

These were the times when ABBA crashed into our living rooms with their bell­bottom trousers and the Muppets caused havoc on TV. And there were strawberries just about everywhere. Sometimes on your coffee cup, but just as likely as a pattern on the living room curtains or as a brand new 1970s ice cream. And, of course, strawberries as wallpaper.

Retro

This wallpaper is a trip back to the 1950s with a clean and stripped surface that is a trademark of functional form.

Ingrid

This particular wallpaper comes from the 1940s but the lace pattern is more reminiscent of the ornamental ’20s.

Viktoria

The print is picked up from a typically ’80s collection, during a time when vintage was a trend that gained momentum as a reaction to the overpriced furniture of the middle class.

Josefina

In the early 1900s when printing techniques became more accessible and wallpapers started to be produced in greater quantities, patterns with the lucky clover began finding their way all across Swedish rustic society. And here it is now, winding its way into the gaps of a classic trellis pattern.

Lilja

When industrialism flourished sometime during the turn of the 19th century a couple of artists decided it was time for a revolution. They wanted to prove what the hand could do and machine could not. Accordingly, they began painting patterns that went above and beyond every rule and tradition known to man during that era.

Carl

This striped wallpaper got its name from Carl Larsson, one of Sweden’s most popular artists. Stripes might very well be the most Swedish pattern of them all.

Helena

This wallpaper from 2012 bears every sign of it. Medallion patterns and gracefully drawn roses in soft pastel with a touch a patina form an idyllic backdrop for everything that was ever personal, that ever captured the essence of you and that will always deserve its very own place in the limelight.

Cart

Your shopping cart is empty.
English
Close

Search